Two days later Harmon Dreer, looking for mail in Main Hall, came across

a notice from the post office apprising him that there was a registered
parcel there which would be delivered to him on presentation of this
notice and satisfactory identification
Two days later Harmon Dreer, looking for mail in Main Hall, came across
a notice from the post office apprising him that there was a registered
parcel there which would be delivered to him on presentation of this
notice and satisfactory identification. Harmon frowned at the slip of
paper a moment, stuffed it into his pocket and sought his nine-o’clock
recitation. A half-hour later, however, having nothing to do until ten,
he started off toward the village. He was half-way down the drive toward
the east gate before he became visible from the window of Thursby’s room
on the front of Torrence. Amy, who had been seated at the window for
half an hour, at once arose, crossed the hall and put his head in at the
door of Number 14.

But life was too busy to leave him much time for troubling about whether

or not Saunders and the others approved of his presence
But life was too busy to leave him much time for troubling about whether
or not Saunders and the others approved of his presence. His work was
cut out for him from the start. Mr. Detweiler was forever at his heels
and Mr. Detweiler’s voice was forever raised in criticism or
instruction. More than once Clint felt like giving up. Toward the end of
that first week it seemed to him that the coach paid no heed to anyone
but just Clint Thayer and that nothing Clint Thayer did was ever quite
right! But he never did give up, however. He was often discouraged,
sometimes angry, always tired out when work was over, but he kept
on trying.

The shout came frantically from somewhere and Clint saw the pigskin,

squeezed from the half-back’s arms, bound into air
The shout came frantically from somewhere and Clint saw the pigskin,
squeezed from the half-back’s arms, bound into air. A blue-sleeved arm
shot toward it, and another, but the ball, bouncing away from an eager
hand, went, turning lazily over and over in its flight, toward the side
line. Clint turned swiftly and pursued, elbowed by others. He shot an
arm out to the left and cleared his path. Cries and pounding footsteps
came to his ears. Away rolled the ball, spurning the five-yard line,
seemingly bent on trickling out of bounds. A blue-jerseyed player tried
to edge past Clint, but the latter swung in front of him. Then he was on
the ball, and up again with it tucked against his stomach, and was
plunging toward the goal line, a scant six yards away! A Claflin man
dived at him and strove to pinion his knees, but with a wrench Clint
tore one leg free and staggered on another stride. Arms clutched him
about the shoulders and it seemed that he was pulling a ton of weight
with him. Then there was a shock, his legs went from under him and he
toppled to earth. But as he fell, and as the last breath in his body
seemed to leave him forever, he pushed the ball away from him at arm’s
length and set his fingers about it like so many vises! And that was the
last he knew.

“I’ve read,” said Amy, “that freezing was a pleasant death, but it

doesn’t seem so
“I’ve read,” said Amy, “that freezing was a pleasant death, but it
doesn’t seem so. Maybe, though, it’s painful just at first.” He arose
with a groan and followed Clint down the slope. There were more briers,
and now and then they stumbled over outcropping rocks. The field seemed
interminable, but after awhile Clint bumped into a wall. They climbed
over it and started on again.

Just then Dreer and his friend came into sight

Just then Dreer and his friend came into sight. Clint watched hopefully.
They were headed straight down the slope and he was just going to lean
his head back against the rock again when Beaufort suddenly hunched his
shoulders and turned angrily toward Clint and Penny. “Here!” he
shouted. “What did you do that for?”

But the rest of Clint’s remark was drowned by the cheer that went up as

the Maroon-and-Grey trotted back around the corner of the grand-stand
But the rest of Clint’s remark was drowned by the cheer that went up as
the Maroon-and-Grey trotted back around the corner of the grand-stand. A
moment later Chambers returned from her seclusion and her warriors
dropped their grey-blue blankets and began to run up and down to
stretch their muscles. Chase watched approvingly.