Amy pretended to view Clint’s advancement to the second team with alarm

Amy pretended to view Clint’s advancement to the second team with alarm.
“First thing I know,” he said gloomily, “I’ll be rooming with a regular
Greek. You’ll be having photographs taken to show your superb physical
development, I dare say, and writing letters to the _Bulletin_ signed
‘Athlete.’ As a matter of fact, Clint, I happened to see that
performance this afternoon and you didn’t fool me a bit. You tackled
Carmine because he was in the way and you ran into him and put your arms
around him to keep from falling on your nose. It was no brilliancy of
yours that made the poor chap fumble the ball. You hit him like a load
of bricks! If I’d been Carmine I’d have up and biffed you one! You
were–were distinctly ungentlemanly, Clint. You should remember that
even in football there are limits. To deliberately try to kill an
opponent, as you did today, is not considered good form. Besides,
Carmine’s a friend of mine. We come from the same metropolis. It would
be a very painful thing if I had to write home to his folks that he had
been killed on the field of battle by my room-mate. A most painful and
embarrassing duty for me, Clint.”

“We can’t count on Saunders coming back before the Cherry Valley game,

if he does then,” said Mr
“We can’t count on Saunders coming back before the Cherry Valley game,
if he does then,” said Mr. Detweiler. “Tyler’s only fair and Trow is not
much better. As for Crewe, he won’t make a good tackle before next year.
He doesn’t sense it at all. We’ve got to find someone else, George. What
about the second? Haven’t they got someone there we can grab and hammer
into a tackle? What about that fellow Thayer? Isn’t that his name?”

The sorrow of Penny’s young life was that, although he had made

innumerable attempts, he could not succeed in the formation of a school
orchestra
The sorrow of Penny’s young life was that, although he had made
innumerable attempts, he could not succeed in the formation of a school
orchestra. There was a Glee Club and a Musical Society, the latter
composed of performers on the mandolin, banjo and guitar, but no one
would take any interest in Penny’s project. Or no one save a fellow
named Pillsbury. Pillsbury played the bass viol, and once a week or so
he and Penny got together and spent an entranced hour. Time was when
such meetings took place in Penny’s room or in Pillsbury’s room, but
popular indignation put an end to that. Nowadays they took their
instruments to the gymnasium and held their chamber concerts in the
trophy room. Amy one day drew Clint’s attention to a fortunate
circumstance. This was that, while there was a connecting door between
Number 14 and Number 15, there was none between Number 14 and Number 13.
That fact, Amy declared, rendered their room fairly habitable when Penny
was pouring out his soul. “It’s lucky in another way,” he added, staring
darkly at the buff-coloured wall that separated them from Number 13. “If
that door was on this side I’d have broken it open long ago and
done murder!”